Hawaii’s agricultural economy has high hopes for hemp after sugar cane, pineapple pull out

Proponents of building a strong hemp industry in Hawaii are hoping the crop will restore the island state’s deep agricultural tradition after long-standing tropical crops that moved off the islands in favor of lower-cost locales have left tens of thousands of acres fallow.

Hawaii’s agricultural economy has high hopes for hemp after sugar cane, pineapple pull out is a post from: Marijuana Business Daily: Financial, Legal & Cannabusiness news for cannabis entrepreneurs

Continue Reading Hawaii’s agricultural economy has high hopes for hemp after sugar cane, pineapple pull out

How Hawaiian Ethos’ Kris Jacobson Works: Cannabis Workspace

<![CDATA[

Name: Kris Jacobson
Location: Hawaii Island 
Title: Director of Cultivation, Hawaiian Ethos
One word to describe your cultivation style: Sustainable 

Indoor, outdoor, greenhouse or a combination: Greenhouse

Can you share a bit of your background and how you and your company got to the present day?

My roots in agriculture go back to my family. Cultivating cannabis is a huge passion and a dream job for me, but I also have a farm on Hawaii Island where I grow other stuff like pineapple and dragon fruit. I’ve been a part of Hawaiian Ethos since the very beginning. We were awarded one of eight licenses in the state back in 2016, and I’ve been a part of the team ever since. The thing that’s shaped Hawaiian Ethos’ path the most is the diversity and depth of our team—we come with backgrounds in agriculture, cannabis, medicine, science [and] tech, all with start up experience. This has allowed us to create an operation and vision that goes beyond just selling weed.

RELATED: How Hawaiian Ethos Approaches Sustainable Packaging Solutions in the Cannabis Industry

What tool or software in your cultivation space can you not live without?

Our Blue Labs Combo Meter (pH meter).

What purchase of $100 or less has most positively impacted your business in the last six months?

While there are a lot of cool gadgets and grow tools out there, having a solid team is priceless. The best $100 we’ve spent has been on providing drinks, snacks and perks for our staff. The Hawaiian Ethos cultivation team works really hard, and taking care of them boosts morale, attention to detail and work ethic.

What cultivation technique are you most interested in right now, and what are you actively studying (the most)?

There are so many exciting projects that the Hawaiian Ethos team is pushing forward. Right now, we’re really focused on aligning our cultivation and extraction process. Growing beautiful flower is important, but it’s also important that we offer other types of products for people who prefer non-pulmonary ways of medicating. Since Hawaiian Ethos does 100% solventless extraction, we’re doing a lot of phenotype hunting, hash washing and rosin pressing experimentation to find plants that make beautiful flower and also extract well. This is especially interesting when it comes to CBD strains, because we’re finding that CBD-rich strains behave differently in extraction. We’re diving deep into figuring out what characteristics of the plant will lend themselves to more efficient and higher quality extracts.

Photo courtesy of Hawaiian Ethos
Hawaiian Ethos operates a greenhouse facility with a focus on sustainability on Hawaii Island.

How has a failure, or apparent failure, set you up for later success? Do you have a “favorite failure” of yours?

Hawaiian Ethos started off with a really sophisticated, complex plan for our cultivation facility. It was a dream set up, but the realities of permitting, building and budgeting soon came into play, and we had to make compromises. It felt like a failure at the time, but we made the changes necessary to survive. In the end, it actually set us up to have a super lean, efficient grow that uses a fraction of the energy and resources the initial setup would have used. We learned that limitation can be a catalyst for innovation.

One of my favorite failures was our Jack Herer strain. We grew a bunch of plants thinking it was Jack Herer, but it turned out to be [a] 2:1 CBD:THC strain that was totally different. I don’t know if it was mislabeled or a freak phenotype, but it ended up being a great strain that’s now a staple on the shelf at our Kailua Kona dispensary.

What advice would you give to a smart, driven grower about to enter the legal, regulated industry? What advice should they ignore?

A lot of growers aren’t used to following rules and working “within the system.” As cannabis moves from the black or gray markets and becomes a legal, regulated space, it’s critical that growers understand the rules and regulations that they must abide by. While it may be obvious that you need to know the cannabis-related laws, it’s just as important to understand the rules around zoning and building for your cultivation site, how to set up your business and pay taxes, etc. Doing your homework, understanding all the rules and making a business plan before jumping in the deep end will save you a ton of stress, money and time.

Ignore the internet. With the plethora of videos giving advice on how to grow on the internet these days, it’s important to have a discerning eye and have a foundation of understanding before trying whatever you see on YouTube. It’s crucial to filter all that information for what’s applicable to your specific situation. There are so many factors to take into account when cultivating cannabis, and there’s no magic bullet that will work in all situations.

How do you deal with burnout?

We definitely work hard, but Hawaiian Ethos fosters a company culture that encourages work-life balance. We also believe in ‘ohana (“family” in Hawaiian), where all members of our staff are part of the family and we all take care of one another. People are less likely to experience burnout when they feel supported and taken care of, even when they’re on the job.

How do you motivate your employees/team?

Knowing that people in our community benefit from our daily work keeps us all motivated. Hearing success stories from patients that get our products from the Kailua Kona dispensary gets us stoked. A lot of us are patients ourselves, and we love hearing about how patients use our medicine, what they’re using it for and the results they’re getting.

What keeps you awake at night?

Growing under the Hawaii sun and seasons introduces dimensions to our cultivation operation that wouldn’t even be factors if we were a strictly indoor, controlled environment grow. Tracking all of our strains, their performance from season to season and their expression in our unique environment is an undertaking, but it’s also necessary and very rewarding to have that intimate, data-driven understanding of our grow.

What helps you sleep at night?

A couple of our Quick Dissolve Tabs or Effervescent Tabs always does the trick! Seriously though, knowing that we’re doing right by our team and right by our patients helps me sleep at night. The medicine we grow helps people get off opioids, have a functional life, or just get through the day. I feel really fulfilled knowing we’re offering a clean, natural, accessible alternative for people.

]]>

Continue Reading How Hawaiian Ethos’ Kris Jacobson Works: Cannabis Workspace

Hawaii health officials ban most CBD products after vape-related hospitalization

Health officials in Hawaii are mandating that over-the-counter CBD products be removed from store shelves after an island youth was hospitalized due to a severe respiratory illness related to vaping. Amid growing national health concerns related to the use of vaporizers, Hawaii Department of Health Director Bruce Anderson told state lawmakers last week that his […]

Hawaii health officials ban most CBD products after vape-related hospitalization is a post from: Marijuana Business Daily: Financial, Legal & Cannabusiness news for cannabis entrepreneurs

Continue Reading Hawaii health officials ban most CBD products after vape-related hospitalization

Congressional Measure Allows Military to Use CBD

The U.S. House of Representatives on July 20 voted 336 to 71 to approve a package of amendments to the National Defense Authorization Act—including one that would allow military personnel to consume CBD and other hemp-derived products. 

“The Secretary of Defense may not prohibit, on the basis of a product containing hemp or any ingredient derived from hemp, the possession, use, or consumption of such product by a member of the Armed Forces,” reads the amendment, sponsored by Hawaii’s controversial Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, a Democrat.

A related measure would allow the heads of the four branches of the military to issue reenlistment waivers for those who admit to having used cannabis or were convicted of a misdemeanor marijuana offense. That measure, introduced by Rep. Ruben Gallego of Arizona, would allow waivers to be granted on a case-by-case basis, Newsweek reports.  

As Marijuana Moment points out, it remains to be seen whether either amendment will make it into the Senate version of the NDAA. But a bipartisan group of senators is trying to attach a cannabis research provision into the defense spending bill. That measure, a rider unrelated to the military, is called the Cannabidiol & Marihuana Research Expansion Act.

Senators Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Chuck Grassley (R-IA) and Brian Schatz (D-HI) are pushing the bill, an effort which may be indicative of hope in the upper House for passing measures corresponding to those introduced by Gabbard and Gallego.

Response to Pentagon Intolerance

Gabbard’s move comes in response to a CBD crackdown by Pentagon brass. As Military.com reports, Acting Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel & Readiness Matthew Donovan in February directed all four branches to issue general orders or regulations prohibiting the use of cannabis-derived products. 

Donovan’s memo cited the supposed threat to “the integrity of the drug testing program” posed by CBD use (a dubious proposition, as legal CBD products contain little to no THC), and indicated that the regulations must be enforceable under Article 92 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice. This is the article that imposes court-martial for failure to obey an order. 

The Army and Air Force both issued such regulations last year. But members of the Navy and Marine Corps were allowed under Department of the Navy regulations to use topical products such as shampoo, lotions and creams.

Donovan’s memo did carve out certain exceptions, including ingestion unawares and use of FDA-approved medications such as Epidiolex, Marinol and Syndros.

PTSD Potential

Gabbard’s amendment is especially significant in light of the potential shown by cannabinoids for treatment of post-traumatic stress syndrome, or PTSD—clearly a question of concern to service members. 

There was a positive response from figures in the cannabis industry who have been exploring the use of preparations to treat PTSD.

“This is a long overdue, but an exciting opportunity for our active military to have access to state-of-the-art CBD products to help them manage chronic pain as well as anxiety and PTSD challenges,” Ed Donnelly, founder of AmourCBD, told Newsweek.

His Illinois-based company markets CBD oils, edibles and creams to first responders and veterans. “CBD and hemp products can help our valued warriors enjoy the quality of life they deserve.”

The percentage of military veterans facing challenges from PTSD is staggering, but the Department of Veterans Affairs remains intransigent on allowing access to cannabis—the only treatment that provides relief for many. And there has been little progress on efforts in Congress to remedy the situation.

The Israeli Health Ministry approved use of cannabis to treat PTSD back in 2015.

TELL US, should the military be able to use CBD and THC?

The post Congressional Measure Allows Military to Use CBD appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Continue Reading Congressional Measure Allows Military to Use CBD

Cosmos & Critters: The Fantastic Glass Art of Nathan Belmont

The art is distinct. It is as if teenage angst — empowered through the heavy metal doom generation of the 1980s — collided with an alien civilization, spewing hordes of infected space dust into the universe. Then, through the pressures of millions of years, these particles transformed into the precious jewels that would one day be used to forge a new world order following the vicious hell ride of the apocalypse. There is also the softer side – one that pays tribute to the unsung beauty of the magnificent creatures on a planet not yet left in ruins from this supposed sci-fi nightmare.

But for 35-year-old Nathan Belmont, the modest glassmaker responsible for giving gobs of liquid sand and other minerals a special spot in this side of the galaxy, the work is simply the product of applying his talent as a shield from the boogeyman known as the real world.

Similar to other masters of their craft, Belmont’s artistic skills were first realized as a youngster growing up in Hawaii. It was there that he spent the majority of his days doing what he refers to as doodling. He was always just trying to get down on the page his own wicked brand of the dragons, gargoyles and other fantasy-beasts dancing around in his head.

Nathan Belmont’s glass art includes both fantastical elements as well as members of the animal kingdom.

“I guess I’ve always had an interest in art,” Belmont said, adding that comic books, cartoons and the splendor that comes from dwelling in paradise are the influences behind his style.

In his early 20s, Belmont first took an interest in glass, accepting an apprenticeship in a small shop located on the island of Maui. It was the work he needed to eventually move onto his own show. But in order to get his name on the grindstone of legends, Belmont had to make a true commitment to his artistic endeavors. This meant earning very little money in exchange for the experience to continue pursuing his passion.

“I considered my time at the glass shop more as a scholarship,” he said. “I was able to make a small wage, enough to sustain myself, and get this enormous amount of knowledge.”

It took seven years for Belmont to go his own way. He launched his first shop on the island in 2010, which he kept for several years before moving to the glass mecca of Eugene, Oregon in late 2017.

Now he keeps himself entranced with the ways of the torch full time, working on a steady stream of projects, collaborations and, of course, still picking up on new tricks of the trade. One of these tricks is turning out unique glass smoking sculptures for the art-adoring masses of the cannabis community. But to hear him tell it, he’s still a novice.

The animal-themed glasswork was created in collaboration with Scott Moan.

“I’m still at somewhat of a learning curve with my own classic pipe-making techniques,” he said. “But I’ve been able to collaborate with some really cool artists [Scott MoanLisa’s Pieces] just having that skill set.”

The creative process, however, is an ever-changing ethos for this glass master. For better or worse, a work-in-progress can always shift from the original concept and spiral into another dimension.

“Sometimes the glass just takes on its own life, and I just kind of go with the flow of the glass,” Belmont explained. “That’s part of the fun, being able to stay spontaneous.”

Although glasswork is an extension of his very being, the business side cannot be ignored. Glassmaking is an expensive trade. There are travel expenses, the cost of supplies, and the times when the bills pour in and income is sparse. But somehow, Belmont has managed to find balance in the chaos, which he attributes to his devotion to staying in the shop even when everything goes to hell.

This glasswork is a collaboration with Scott Moan.

“You get what you put into it,” he said. “There are weeks where I don’t get paid. But when I do put my all into a piece and it comes out to my standards, and it’s a piece I feel good about, then it usually pays me back. You definitely get back the love you put into it.”

And if the grind of shop life ever gets too hairy, and the rhythmic sounds of Paul Simon’s ‘Kodachrome’ aren’t cutting it, there is always cannabis to the rescue. Belmont says the herb provides him with a center when art and the throes of capitalism collide.

nathan belmont fish glass art

This glasswork is a collaboration with Scott Moan.

“I get revved up. I definitely need to cool myself down every once and a while, so [cannabis] helps me stay in a consistent, working mind frame. It definitely helps with the creative aspect. Plus, the culture provides me with a way to sell my art.”

TELL US, do you have a favorite glass artist?

Originally published in the print edition of Cannabis Now. LEARN MORE

The post Cosmos & Critters: The Fantastic Glass Art of Nathan Belmont appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Continue Reading Cosmos & Critters: The Fantastic Glass Art of Nathan Belmont

Cosmos & Critters: The Fantastic Glass Art of Nathan Belmont

The art is distinct. It is as if teenage angst — empowered through the heavy metal doom generation of the 1980s — collided with an alien civilization, spewing hordes of infected space dust into the universe. Then, through the pressures of millions of years, these particles transformed into the precious jewels that would one day be used to forge a new world order following the vicious hell ride of the apocalypse. There is also the softer side – one that pays tribute to the unsung beauty of the magnificent creatures on a planet not yet left in ruins from this supposed sci-fi nightmare.

But for 35-year-old Nathan Belmont, the modest glassmaker responsible for giving gobs of liquid sand and other minerals a special spot in this side of the galaxy, the work is simply the product of applying his talent as a shield from the boogeyman known as the real world.

Similar to other masters of their craft, Belmont’s artistic skills were first realized as a youngster growing up in Hawaii. It was there that he spent the majority of his days doing what he refers to as doodling. He was always just trying to get down on the page his own wicked brand of the dragons, gargoyles and other fantasy-beasts dancing around in his head.

Nathan Belmont’s glass art includes both fantastical elements as well as members of the animal kingdom.

“I guess I’ve always had an interest in art,” Belmont said, adding that comic books, cartoons and the splendor that comes from dwelling in paradise are the influences behind his style.

In his early 20s, Belmont first took an interest in glass, accepting an apprenticeship in a small shop located on the island of Maui. It was the work he needed to eventually move onto his own show. But in order to get his name on the grindstone of legends, Belmont had to make a true commitment to his artistic endeavors. This meant earning very little money in exchange for the experience to continue pursuing his passion.

“I considered my time at the glass shop more as a scholarship,” he said. “I was able to make a small wage, enough to sustain myself, and get this enormous amount of knowledge.”

It took seven years for Belmont to go his own way. He launched his first shop on the island in 2010, which he kept for several years before moving to the glass mecca of Eugene, Oregon in late 2017.

Now he keeps himself entranced with the ways of the torch full time, working on a steady stream of projects, collaborations and, of course, still picking up on new tricks of the trade. One of these tricks is turning out unique glass smoking sculptures for the art-adoring masses of the cannabis community. But to hear him tell it, he’s still a novice.

The animal-themed glasswork was created in collaboration with Scott Moan.

“I’m still at somewhat of a learning curve with my own classic pipe-making techniques,” he said. “But I’ve been able to collaborate with some really cool artists [Scott MoanLisa’s Pieces] just having that skill set.”

The creative process, however, is an ever-changing ethos for this glass master. For better or worse, a work-in-progress can always shift from the original concept and spiral into another dimension.

“Sometimes the glass just takes on its own life, and I just kind of go with the flow of the glass,” Belmont explained. “That’s part of the fun, being able to stay spontaneous.”

Although glasswork is an extension of his very being, the business side cannot be ignored. Glassmaking is an expensive trade. There are travel expenses, the cost of supplies, and the times when the bills pour in and income is sparse. But somehow, Belmont has managed to find balance in the chaos, which he attributes to his devotion to staying in the shop even when everything goes to hell.

This glasswork is a collaboration with Scott Moan.

“You get what you put into it,” he said. “There are weeks where I don’t get paid. But when I do put my all into a piece and it comes out to my standards, and it’s a piece I feel good about, then it usually pays me back. You definitely get back the love you put into it.”

And if the grind of shop life ever gets too hairy, and the rhythmic sounds of Paul Simon’s ‘Kodachrome’ aren’t cutting it, there is always cannabis to the rescue. Belmont says the herb provides him with a center when art and the throes of capitalism collide.

nathan belmont fish glass art

This glasswork is a collaboration with Scott Moan.

“I get revved up. I definitely need to cool myself down every once and a while, so [cannabis] helps me stay in a consistent, working mind frame. It definitely helps with the creative aspect. Plus, the culture provides me with a way to sell my art.”

TELL US, do you have a favorite glass artist?

Originally published in the print edition of Cannabis Now. LEARN MORE

The post Cosmos & Critters: The Fantastic Glass Art of Nathan Belmont appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Continue Reading Cosmos & Critters: The Fantastic Glass Art of Nathan Belmont

Cosmos & Critters: The Fantastic Glass Art of Nathan Belmont

The art is distinct. It is as if teenage angst — empowered through the heavy metal doom generation of the 1980s — collided with an alien civilization, spewing hordes of infected space dust into the universe. Then, through the pressures of millions of years, these particles transformed into the precious jewels that would one day be used to forge a new world order following the vicious hell ride of the apocalypse. There is also the softer side – one that pays tribute to the unsung beauty of the magnificent creatures on a planet not yet left in ruins from this supposed sci-fi nightmare.

But for 35-year-old Nathan Belmont, the modest glassmaker responsible for giving gobs of liquid sand and other minerals a special spot in this side of the galaxy, the work is simply the product of applying his talent as a shield from the boogeyman known as the real world.

Similar to other masters of their craft, Belmont’s artistic skills were first realized as a youngster growing up in Hawaii. It was there that he spent the majority of his days doing what he refers to as doodling. He was always just trying to get down on the page his own wicked brand of the dragons, gargoyles and other fantasy-beasts dancing around in his head.

Nathan Belmont’s glass art includes both fantastical elements as well as members of the animal kingdom.

“I guess I’ve always had an interest in art,” Belmont said, adding that comic books, cartoons and the splendor that comes from dwelling in paradise are the influences behind his style.

In his early 20s, Belmont first took an interest in glass, accepting an apprenticeship in a small shop located on the island of Maui. It was the work he needed to eventually move onto his own show. But in order to get his name on the grindstone of legends, Belmont had to make a true commitment to his artistic endeavors. This meant earning very little money in exchange for the experience to continue pursuing his passion.

“I considered my time at the glass shop more as a scholarship,” he said. “I was able to make a small wage, enough to sustain myself, and get this enormous amount of knowledge.”

It took seven years for Belmont to go his own way. He launched his first shop on the island in 2010, which he kept for several years before moving to the glass mecca of Eugene, Oregon in late 2017.

Now he keeps himself entranced with the ways of the torch full time, working on a steady stream of projects, collaborations and, of course, still picking up on new tricks of the trade. One of these tricks is turning out unique glass smoking sculptures for the art-adoring masses of the cannabis community. But to hear him tell it, he’s still a novice.

The animal-themed glasswork was created in collaboration with Scott Moan.

“I’m still at somewhat of a learning curve with my own classic pipe-making techniques,” he said. “But I’ve been able to collaborate with some really cool artists [Scott MoanLisa’s Pieces] just having that skill set.”

The creative process, however, is an ever-changing ethos for this glass master. For better or worse, a work-in-progress can always shift from the original concept and spiral into another dimension.

“Sometimes the glass just takes on its own life, and I just kind of go with the flow of the glass,” Belmont explained. “That’s part of the fun, being able to stay spontaneous.”

Although glasswork is an extension of his very being, the business side cannot be ignored. Glassmaking is an expensive trade. There are travel expenses, the cost of supplies, and the times when the bills pour in and income is sparse. But somehow, Belmont has managed to find balance in the chaos, which he attributes to his devotion to staying in the shop even when everything goes to hell.

This glasswork is a collaboration with Scott Moan.

“You get what you put into it,” he said. “There are weeks where I don’t get paid. But when I do put my all into a piece and it comes out to my standards, and it’s a piece I feel good about, then it usually pays me back. You definitely get back the love you put into it.”

And if the grind of shop life ever gets too hairy, and the rhythmic sounds of Paul Simon’s ‘Kodachrome’ aren’t cutting it, there is always cannabis to the rescue. Belmont says the herb provides him with a center when art and the throes of capitalism collide.

nathan belmont fish glass art

This glasswork is a collaboration with Scott Moan.

“I get revved up. I definitely need to cool myself down every once and a while, so [cannabis] helps me stay in a consistent, working mind frame. It definitely helps with the creative aspect. Plus, the culture provides me with a way to sell my art.”

TELL US, do you have a favorite glass artist?

Originally published in the print edition of Cannabis Now. LEARN MORE

The post Cosmos & Critters: The Fantastic Glass Art of Nathan Belmont appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Continue Reading Cosmos & Critters: The Fantastic Glass Art of Nathan Belmont