CBD Topicals vs Oils: What’s The Difference?

Derived from the hemp plant, cannabidiol (CBD) can provide a host of benefits to the mind and body, all without inducing intoxicating effects.

But with all the different CBD products available on the market, how do you know which one to use? More specifically, CBD oil and topicals may be applied similarly. How do they compare to each other? How do they differ? And more importantly, which one should you use to target whatever ailment you’re experiencing?

CBD Oil

Oil can be applied topically to specific areas that are experiencing discomfort. It’s also an ideal substance to use for a massage, as oils help to lubricate the skin and minimize any friction while a massage is being performed.

The use of CBD oils during a massage also provides the opportunity to add essential oils to help both nourish the skin and provide an aromatic experience.

But CBD is also often taken orally, usually under the tongue using a dropper. By consuming CBD oil orally, it can have a more systemic effect on the entire body. [1]

CBD Topicals

Topicals can be further broken down into different formats, including tinctures, creams, salves, and ointments, each of which has a different texture, consistency, and base.

The different CBD topical formats may also differ in CBD potency, much like CBD oils. These types of products tend to be more commonly used to target specific areas of the body. [1]

Which Should You Use?

The decision between oils and topicals ultimately depends on the reason why you’re using CBD and what your comfort level and preference is. Generally speaking, both topicals and oils can work for pain management.

That said, topicals may be more effective for alleviating acute pain, inflammation, and headaches in a more targeted manner. They may also be more effective for treating skin issues, including eczema, psoriasis, and dermatitis. Further, topicals may be included in a regular skin care regimen to promote healthier skin.

But for those looking to manage chronic stress, anxiety, or insomnia, CBD oils that can be ingested orally may be optimal, as the effects will be more long lasting and impact the body as a whole. It is also easier to control dosing with the oral route. [1]

Having said all that, combining both topical CBD along with oral CBD may provide the best of both worlds. We always recommend speaking to your doctor before initiating CBD use. And it’s also important to test out different products to see which might work best for your body.

Image Credit: Silviarita

Image Source: https://pixabay.com/photos/oil-lip-balm-beeswax-flowers-4262839/

Reference

  1. Bruni N, et al. Cannabinoid delivery systems for pain and inflammation treatment. Molecules. 2018;23(10):2478.

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How Topicals May Treat Atopic Dermatitis

Topical products are a unique way to administer cannabidiol (CBD) and other cannabinoids. Topicals possess many advantages as an alternative method, as patients who are not comfortable with broadcasting their cannabis use to the world can use lotions or creams discreetly. Topicals are also beneficial for targeting certain areas like the hands, back, or legs.

Topicals can also take effect rapidly, as they bypass the stomach and digestive system, going straight through the skin to bloodstream.[1] But the benefits of topicals don’t stop there. In fact, for some dermatological conditions, topicals might actually exert its effects by enhancing function of the skin barrier.

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a condition characterized by chronic inflammation and uncomfortable itching. Research on the mechanism of AD has revealed damage to skin barrier function due to the effects of pro-inflammatory substances like cytokines.[2]

Several cannabinoids are effective at relieving AD symptoms, likely due to their anti-inflammatory properties.[3,4] Studies have dug further to better understand the mechanism underlying these effects.

Treatment with oxazolone solution (1% in acetone) mimics the effects of AD in pre-clinical models. Using this technique, as well as cell assays, researchers found that cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor agonists (which increase the function of the receptor) inhibited the production of inflammatory compounds linked to AD.[5]

An additional study employing the same AD model confirmed these findings. However, researchers also found that CB1 agonists significantly accelerated and improved skin barrier recovery.[2]

These results support the use of cannabinoids like palmitoyl ethanolamide, or PEA. In fact, this endocannabinoid has been used to treat dermatological conditions like AD.[6] While PEA is a CB2 agonist, it stimulates anandamide, another endocannabinoid, to activate the CB1 receptor. These actions in turn alleviate itch.[3,4,6]

While there are many benefits of topical use, a greater understanding of how cannabinoids exert their effects on dermatological conditions like AD may help when choosing the right therapy. For example, knowing which cannabis compounds work directly via the CB1 receptor or CB2 can help you in discussing a plan with your doctor or dispensary.

It’s also important to keep in mind the benefits of the “entourage effect,” or the power of full-spectrum cannabis brought on by both cannabinoids and terpenes.[7] So, if you haven’t used topicals before, trying out different products may be best to determine what works best for you and your condition.

Image Credit: Skeeze

 Image Source: https://pixabay.com/photos/clasped-hands-comfort-hands-black-541849/

References

  1. Huestis MA. Human cannabinoid pharmacokinetics. Chem Biodivers. 2007;4(8):1770-1804.
  2. Kim HJ, et al. Topical cannabinoid receptor 1 agonist attenuates the cutaneous inflammatory responses in oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis model. Int J Dermatol. 2015;54(10):e401-408.
  3. Sheriff T, et al. The potential role of cannabinoids in dermatology. J Dermatolog Treat. 2020;31(8):839-845.
  4. Eagleston LRM, et al. Cannabinoids in dermatology: a scoping review. Dermatol Online J. 2018;24(6):13030.
  5. Nam G, et al. Selective cannabinoid receptor-1 agonists regulate mast cell activation in an oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis model. Ann Dermatol. 2016;28(1):22-29.
  6. Borrelli F, et al. Palmitoylethanolamide, a naturally occurring lipid, is an orally effective intestinal anti-inflammatory agent. Br J Pharmacol. 2015;172(1):142-158.
  7. Russo EB. Taming THC: potential cannabis synergy and phytocannabinoid-terpenoid entourage effects. Br J Pharmacol. 2011;163(7):1344-1364.

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Treat the Aches & Pains of Aging with Cannabis Topicals

Almost half of adults aged 65 or older have arthritis. The Center for Disease Control says arthritis and other rheumatic conditions represent a leading cause of disability among U.S. adults — and the leading cause for the past 15 years.

And since the risk of arthritis increases with age, there will only be more patients searching for effective alternative treatments for pain as the senior population grows.

Among them is Jane, a 67-year-old woman who suffers from osteoarthritis and has found relief by using cannabis.

Jane developed osteoarthritis in her knee from years of working on her feet, a condition exacerbated by the weight she gained over the past 20 years.

She uses a cane to walk and says her pain medication leaves her groggy and depressed, with no desire to leave her home. Her daughter saw the negative impacts the medication was having on her mother’s mood and gave her a topical salve containing THC and CBD. It relieved her pain enough to be able to set aside her cane when she is at home.

Seeking further non-euphoric relief, Jane explored different ratios of CBD and THC in capsule form to help with her pain (especially at night) and found a balance that not only reduced her use of pain medication, but also relieved her anxiety and depression.

Cannabis can be utilized at therapeutic levels for both pain relief and the maintenance of inflammation. Many seniors start with non-euphoric solutions like cannabis topicals, which can mean using lotions, salves, roll-ons and even medicated epsom salts for soaking or hot compresses.

Jane likes that using topicals and edibles gives her the ability to enjoy time with her family and manage her pain without grogginess — and without the smell that comes from smoking.

She isn’t alone; many patients with inflammatory arthritis have been successfully treating it with topical use and experimenting with ratios of CBD to THC in edibles. And there’s data to back up those personal experiences — research is showing that topical administration of cannabis has proven to have analgesic effects in animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, especially for the control of breakthrough pain.

In fact, a study published in Rheumatology discovered that rheumatoid arthritis patients have more CB2 receptors on their cells than other arthritis patients. Recent research also found that psoriasis plaques can be treated with topicals high in CBD because the anti-inflammatory effects help reduce the plaques, without thinning the skin like a steroidal cream.

Maria Mangini is a pioneer of the medical cannabis and psychedelic research movement, and a family nurse practitioner. She says that 70 percent of the patients she consults see her for pain issues and noted a large percentage of those patients suffer from some type of arthritis.

She says osteoarthritis patients may benefit from the synergistic effects THC has with opioid receptors, creating greater pain relief with less opioid use. She added that if the joint pain is not too deep (as in hip joints), a topical medicine could prove useful in treating pain as well.

With the opioid epidemic still in full swing and the FDA’s recent warning that all non-aspirin NSAIDs put patients at increased risk for heart attack, stroke and heart failure, is it any wonder that our fast-growing senior population is becoming more open to alternative therapies? Or that cannabis — one of the most effective natural medicines on Earth — is now becoming a bigger part of the conversation?

Originally published in the print edition of Cannabis Now. LEARN MORE

TELL US, have you ever tried a topical?

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Treat the Aches & Pains of Aging with Cannabis Topicals

Almost half of adults aged 65 or older have arthritis. The Center for Disease Control says arthritis and other rheumatic conditions represent a leading cause of disability among U.S. adults — and the leading cause for the past 15 years.

And since the risk of arthritis increases with age, there will only be more patients searching for effective alternative treatments for pain as the senior population grows.

Among them is Jane, a 67-year-old woman who suffers from osteoarthritis and has found relief by using cannabis.

Jane developed osteoarthritis in her knee from years of working on her feet, a condition exacerbated by the weight she gained over the past 20 years.

She uses a cane to walk and says her pain medication leaves her groggy and depressed, with no desire to leave her home. Her daughter saw the negative impacts the medication was having on her mother’s mood and gave her a topical salve containing THC and CBD. It relieved her pain enough to be able to set aside her cane when she is at home.

Seeking further non-euphoric relief, Jane explored different ratios of CBD and THC in capsule form to help with her pain (especially at night) and found a balance that not only reduced her use of pain medication, but also relieved her anxiety and depression.

Cannabis can be utilized at therapeutic levels for both pain relief and the maintenance of inflammation. Many seniors start with non-euphoric solutions like cannabis topicals, which can mean using lotions, salves, roll-ons and even medicated epsom salts for soaking or hot compresses.

Jane likes that using topicals and edibles gives her the ability to enjoy time with her family and manage her pain without grogginess — and without the smell that comes from smoking.

She isn’t alone; many patients with inflammatory arthritis have been successfully treating it with topical use and experimenting with ratios of CBD to THC in edibles. And there’s data to back up those personal experiences — research is showing that topical administration of cannabis has proven to have analgesic effects in animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, especially for the control of breakthrough pain.

In fact, a study published in Rheumatology discovered that rheumatoid arthritis patients have more CB2 receptors on their cells than other arthritis patients. Recent research also found that psoriasis plaques can be treated with topicals high in CBD because the anti-inflammatory effects help reduce the plaques, without thinning the skin like a steroidal cream.

Maria Mangini is a pioneer of the medical cannabis and psychedelic research movement, and a family nurse practitioner. She says that 70 percent of the patients she consults see her for pain issues and noted a large percentage of those patients suffer from some type of arthritis.

She says osteoarthritis patients may benefit from the synergistic effects THC has with opioid receptors, creating greater pain relief with less opioid use. She added that if the joint pain is not too deep (as in hip joints), a topical medicine could prove useful in treating pain as well.

With the opioid epidemic still in full swing and the FDA’s recent warning that all non-aspirin NSAIDs put patients at increased risk for heart attack, stroke and heart failure, is it any wonder that our fast-growing senior population is becoming more open to alternative therapies? Or that cannabis — one of the most effective natural medicines on Earth — is now becoming a bigger part of the conversation?

Originally published in the print edition of Cannabis Now. LEARN MORE

TELL US, have you ever tried a topical?

The post Treat the Aches & Pains of Aging with Cannabis Topicals appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Continue Reading Treat the Aches & Pains of Aging with Cannabis Topicals

Treat the Aches & Pains of Aging with Cannabis Topicals

Almost half of adults aged 65 or older have arthritis. The Center for Disease Control says arthritis and other rheumatic conditions represent a leading cause of disability among U.S. adults — and the leading cause for the past 15 years.

And since the risk of arthritis increases with age, there will only be more patients searching for effective alternative treatments for pain as the senior population grows.

Among them is Jane, a 67-year-old woman who suffers from osteoarthritis and has found relief by using cannabis.

Jane developed osteoarthritis in her knee from years of working on her feet, a condition exacerbated by the weight she gained over the past 20 years.

She uses a cane to walk and says her pain medication leaves her groggy and depressed, with no desire to leave her home. Her daughter saw the negative impacts the medication was having on her mother’s mood and gave her a topical salve containing THC and CBD. It relieved her pain enough to be able to set aside her cane when she is at home.

Seeking further non-euphoric relief, Jane explored different ratios of CBD and THC in capsule form to help with her pain (especially at night) and found a balance that not only reduced her use of pain medication, but also relieved her anxiety and depression.

Cannabis can be utilized at therapeutic levels for both pain relief and the maintenance of inflammation. Many seniors start with non-euphoric solutions like cannabis topicals, which can mean using lotions, salves, roll-ons and even medicated epsom salts for soaking or hot compresses.

Jane likes that using topicals and edibles gives her the ability to enjoy time with her family and manage her pain without grogginess — and without the smell that comes from smoking.

She isn’t alone; many patients with inflammatory arthritis have been successfully treating it with topical use and experimenting with ratios of CBD to THC in edibles. And there’s data to back up those personal experiences — research is showing that topical administration of cannabis has proven to have analgesic effects in animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, especially for the control of breakthrough pain.

In fact, a study published in Rheumatology discovered that rheumatoid arthritis patients have more CB2 receptors on their cells than other arthritis patients. Recent research also found that psoriasis plaques can be treated with topicals high in CBD because the anti-inflammatory effects help reduce the plaques, without thinning the skin like a steroidal cream.

Maria Mangini is a pioneer of the medical cannabis and psychedelic research movement, and a family nurse practitioner. She says that 70 percent of the patients she consults see her for pain issues and noted a large percentage of those patients suffer from some type of arthritis.

She says osteoarthritis patients may benefit from the synergistic effects THC has with opioid receptors, creating greater pain relief with less opioid use. She added that if the joint pain is not too deep (as in hip joints), a topical medicine could prove useful in treating pain as well.

With the opioid epidemic still in full swing and the FDA’s recent warning that all non-aspirin NSAIDs put patients at increased risk for heart attack, stroke and heart failure, is it any wonder that our fast-growing senior population is becoming more open to alternative therapies? Or that cannabis — one of the most effective natural medicines on Earth — is now becoming a bigger part of the conversation?

Originally published in the print edition of Cannabis Now. LEARN MORE

TELL US, have you ever tried a topical?

The post Treat the Aches & Pains of Aging with Cannabis Topicals appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Continue Reading Treat the Aches & Pains of Aging with Cannabis Topicals

Treat the Aches & Pains of Aging with Cannabis Topicals

Almost half of adults aged 65 or older have arthritis. The Center for Disease Control says arthritis and other rheumatic conditions represent a leading cause of disability among U.S. adults — and the leading cause for the past 15 years.

And since the risk of arthritis increases with age, there will only be more patients searching for effective alternative treatments for pain as the senior population grows.

Among them is Jane, a 67-year-old woman who suffers from osteoarthritis and has found relief by using cannabis.

Jane developed osteoarthritis in her knee from years of working on her feet, a condition exacerbated by the weight she gained over the past 20 years.

She uses a cane to walk and says her pain medication leaves her groggy and depressed, with no desire to leave her home. Her daughter saw the negative impacts the medication was having on her mother’s mood and gave her a topical salve containing THC and CBD. It relieved her pain enough to be able to set aside her cane when she is at home.

Seeking further non-euphoric relief, Jane explored different ratios of CBD and THC in capsule form to help with her pain (especially at night) and found a balance that not only reduced her use of pain medication, but also relieved her anxiety and depression.

Cannabis can be utilized at therapeutic levels for both pain relief and the maintenance of inflammation. Many seniors start with non-euphoric solutions like cannabis topicals, which can mean using lotions, salves, roll-ons and even medicated epsom salts for soaking or hot compresses.

Jane likes that using topicals and edibles gives her the ability to enjoy time with her family and manage her pain without grogginess — and without the smell that comes from smoking.

She isn’t alone; many patients with inflammatory arthritis have been successfully treating it with topical use and experimenting with ratios of CBD to THC in edibles. And there’s data to back up those personal experiences — research is showing that topical administration of cannabis has proven to have analgesic effects in animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, especially for the control of breakthrough pain.

In fact, a study published in Rheumatology discovered that rheumatoid arthritis patients have more CB2 receptors on their cells than other arthritis patients. Recent research also found that psoriasis plaques can be treated with topicals high in CBD because the anti-inflammatory effects help reduce the plaques, without thinning the skin like a steroidal cream.

Maria Mangini is a pioneer of the medical cannabis and psychedelic research movement, and a family nurse practitioner. She says that 70 percent of the patients she consults see her for pain issues and noted a large percentage of those patients suffer from some type of arthritis.

She says osteoarthritis patients may benefit from the synergistic effects THC has with opioid receptors, creating greater pain relief with less opioid use. She added that if the joint pain is not too deep (as in hip joints), a topical medicine could prove useful in treating pain as well.

With the opioid epidemic still in full swing and the FDA’s recent warning that all non-aspirin NSAIDs put patients at increased risk for heart attack, stroke and heart failure, is it any wonder that our fast-growing senior population is becoming more open to alternative therapies? Or that cannabis — one of the most effective natural medicines on Earth — is now becoming a bigger part of the conversation?

Originally published in the print edition of Cannabis Now. LEARN MORE

TELL US, have you ever tried a topical?

The post Treat the Aches & Pains of Aging with Cannabis Topicals appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Continue Reading Treat the Aches & Pains of Aging with Cannabis Topicals

Treat the Aches & Pains of Aging with Cannabis Topicals

Almost half of adults aged 65 or older have arthritis. The Center for Disease Control says arthritis and other rheumatic conditions represent a leading cause of disability among U.S. adults — and the leading cause for the past 15 years.

And since the risk of arthritis increases with age, there will only be more patients searching for effective alternative treatments for pain as the senior population grows.

Among them is Jane, a 67-year-old woman who suffers from osteoarthritis and has found relief by using cannabis.

Jane developed osteoarthritis in her knee from years of working on her feet, a condition exacerbated by the weight she gained over the past 20 years.

She uses a cane to walk and says her pain medication leaves her groggy and depressed, with no desire to leave her home. Her daughter saw the negative impacts the medication was having on her mother’s mood and gave her a topical salve containing THC and CBD. It relieved her pain enough to be able to set aside her cane when she is at home.

Seeking further non-euphoric relief, Jane explored different ratios of CBD and THC in capsule form to help with her pain (especially at night) and found a balance that not only reduced her use of pain medication, but also relieved her anxiety and depression.

Cannabis can be utilized at therapeutic levels for both pain relief and the maintenance of inflammation. Many seniors start with non-euphoric solutions like cannabis topicals, which can mean using lotions, salves, roll-ons and even medicated epsom salts for soaking or hot compresses.

Jane likes that using topicals and edibles gives her the ability to enjoy time with her family and manage her pain without grogginess — and without the smell that comes from smoking.

She isn’t alone; many patients with inflammatory arthritis have been successfully treating it with topical use and experimenting with ratios of CBD to THC in edibles. And there’s data to back up those personal experiences — research is showing that topical administration of cannabis has proven to have analgesic effects in animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, especially for the control of breakthrough pain.

In fact, a study published in Rheumatology discovered that rheumatoid arthritis patients have more CB2 receptors on their cells than other arthritis patients. Recent research also found that psoriasis plaques can be treated with topicals high in CBD because the anti-inflammatory effects help reduce the plaques, without thinning the skin like a steroidal cream.

Maria Mangini is a pioneer of the medical cannabis and psychedelic research movement, and a family nurse practitioner. She says that 70 percent of the patients she consults see her for pain issues and noted a large percentage of those patients suffer from some type of arthritis.

She says osteoarthritis patients may benefit from the synergistic effects THC has with opioid receptors, creating greater pain relief with less opioid use. She added that if the joint pain is not too deep (as in hip joints), a topical medicine could prove useful in treating pain as well.

With the opioid epidemic still in full swing and the FDA’s recent warning that all non-aspirin NSAIDs put patients at increased risk for heart attack, stroke and heart failure, is it any wonder that our fast-growing senior population is becoming more open to alternative therapies? Or that cannabis — one of the most effective natural medicines on Earth — is now becoming a bigger part of the conversation?

Originally published in the print edition of Cannabis Now. LEARN MORE

TELL US, have you ever tried a topical?

The post Treat the Aches & Pains of Aging with Cannabis Topicals appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Continue Reading Treat the Aches & Pains of Aging with Cannabis Topicals

Treat the Aches & Pains of Aging with Cannabis Topicals

Almost half of adults aged 65 or older have arthritis. The Center for Disease Control says arthritis and other rheumatic conditions represent a leading cause of disability among U.S. adults — and the leading cause for the past 15 years.

And since the risk of arthritis increases with age, there will only be more patients searching for effective alternative treatments for pain as the senior population grows.

Among them is Jane, a 67-year-old woman who suffers from osteoarthritis and has found relief by using cannabis.

Jane developed osteoarthritis in her knee from years of working on her feet, a condition exacerbated by the weight she gained over the past 20 years.

She uses a cane to walk and says her pain medication leaves her groggy and depressed, with no desire to leave her home. Her daughter saw the negative impacts the medication was having on her mother’s mood and gave her a topical salve containing THC and CBD. It relieved her pain enough to be able to set aside her cane when she is at home.

Seeking further non-euphoric relief, Jane explored different ratios of CBD and THC in capsule form to help with her pain (especially at night) and found a balance that not only reduced her use of pain medication, but also relieved her anxiety and depression.

Cannabis can be utilized at therapeutic levels for both pain relief and the maintenance of inflammation. Many seniors start with non-euphoric solutions like cannabis topicals, which can mean using lotions, salves, roll-ons and even medicated epsom salts for soaking or hot compresses.

Jane likes that using topicals and edibles gives her the ability to enjoy time with her family and manage her pain without grogginess — and without the smell that comes from smoking.

She isn’t alone; many patients with inflammatory arthritis have been successfully treating it with topical use and experimenting with ratios of CBD to THC in edibles. And there’s data to back up those personal experiences — research is showing that topical administration of cannabis has proven to have analgesic effects in animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, especially for the control of breakthrough pain.

In fact, a study published in Rheumatology discovered that rheumatoid arthritis patients have more CB2 receptors on their cells than other arthritis patients. Recent research also found that psoriasis plaques can be treated with topicals high in CBD because the anti-inflammatory effects help reduce the plaques, without thinning the skin like a steroidal cream.

Maria Mangini is a pioneer of the medical cannabis and psychedelic research movement, and a family nurse practitioner. She says that 70 percent of the patients she consults see her for pain issues and noted a large percentage of those patients suffer from some type of arthritis.

She says osteoarthritis patients may benefit from the synergistic effects THC has with opioid receptors, creating greater pain relief with less opioid use. She added that if the joint pain is not too deep (as in hip joints), a topical medicine could prove useful in treating pain as well.

With the opioid epidemic still in full swing and the FDA’s recent warning that all non-aspirin NSAIDs put patients at increased risk for heart attack, stroke and heart failure, is it any wonder that our fast-growing senior population is becoming more open to alternative therapies? Or that cannabis — one of the most effective natural medicines on Earth — is now becoming a bigger part of the conversation?

Originally published in the print edition of Cannabis Now. LEARN MORE

TELL US, have you ever tried a topical?

The post Treat the Aches & Pains of Aging with Cannabis Topicals appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Continue Reading Treat the Aches & Pains of Aging with Cannabis Topicals