CBD News: The Subsidiary Body on Implementation at its first meeting urged Parties that have not yet done so to submit their financial reports where feasible by 31 August 2016, in time for the preparation of documentation for the thirteenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties. SBI-1 also urged recipient Parties that have not done so to submit the completed questionnaire as well as updates, if any, of the existing submissions by the same date. <p>Parties can access the online financial reporting framework by clicking on the "Read more" link below (login required) and the GEF-7 questionnaire by clicking <a href="https://www.cbd.int/financial/survey2016.shtml">here</a>.</p>

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Continue Reading CBD News: The Subsidiary Body on Implementation at its first meeting urged Parties that have not yet done so to submit their financial reports where feasible by 31 August 2016, in time for the preparation of documentation for the thirteenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties. SBI-1 also urged recipient Parties that have not done so to submit the completed questionnaire as well as updates, if any, of the existing submissions by the same date. <p>Parties can access the online financial reporting framework by clicking on the "Read more" link below (login required) and the GEF-7 questionnaire by clicking <a href="https://www.cbd.int/financial/survey2016.shtml">here</a>.</p>

How To Battle Animal & Mold Infestations in Outdoor Cannabis Grows

All outdoor marijuana crops have the potential to be destroyed by one or two of the various problems lurking in the wilderness, unlike indoor growing where plants are protected. In checking on the crop, make sure to keep an eye on the little details that will spell trouble later. There are a few different things to look for:

Aphids

An aphid infestation is a hard infestation to get rid of. For most of us, using chemical insecticide is the no-brainer solution, and they’re right. Aphids are very hard to kill. Chemicals can be used if the plant is still in the green foliage growth stage. If the scheduled harvest is just 2 or 3 weeks away, don’t use chemical insecticides, as the chemicals will still be present in the finished product. No one wants to risk the dangerous side effects of smoking chemicals.

The natural way to get rid of an aphid infestation on a marijuana plant involves a few steps and a bit of work. Go out and buy a few geraniums. Geraniums exude hormones that pests don’t like. Make a few palm sized cloth bags full of the geranium leaves and hang them on each plant. The hormones the geraniums exude will keep the aphids away. Now the aphid eggs left behind have to be dealt with.

Find a good thick soft cloth and some antibacterial / insecticide soap. The aphid’s eggs will be found mostly on the underside of the leaves of the plant. Using some care, just run the soapy cloth under each leaf, just once. You don’t want to scrub the leaves; just one pass over them will do if the cloth is good and soapy. You’ll feel a slight tug on the washcloth with every aphid egg that you’re displacing.

Depending on the degree of infestation, if you’re using a growing medium such as a peat and perlite mixture, the top coat might have to be replaced. The peat and perlite growing medium gives the aphids many crooks and crevasses to lay eggs in. Dig out the first inch or two and replace it with pH balanced peat and perlite mixture. Be sure to be careful around the roots and everything will be okay.

Since antibacterial / insecticide soap was used, be sure to mist the underside of the leaves for about a week to remove any traces of the chemicals in question. If there are buds present, try not to spray the pH balanced water on them. A happy nug is a dry nug.

Molds & Fungus

Since every grow operation requires standing water of some kind, one must at all times be vigilant when it comes to mold and fungal infestations. They both like to grow in standing water or on surfaces that are wet most of the time. Both molds and fungus can be made of some very nasty substances that can harm humans. If you suspect an infestation of mold or fungus, wear rubber gloves while checking things out.

The first sign of mold or fungus is the smell. It’s hard to not take a good sniff of each plant, as most stoners enjoy the scent of a marijuana plant. If you smell a damp and rotted scent while sniffing, you’ve got a problem. It might be time to break out the chemicals.

The first place to look for mold is on the part of the main stem that sticks out from the roots. Check to see if there is a slimy residue on it. If there is, then it’s time for the chemicals to come out. There is just no way around spraying the stalk with fungicide if it is moldy. This is because the base of the stem is where the plant supports itself and is the first part of the plant that allows the nutrients from the root to spread within the rest of the plant.

There might be the urge to wipe the now dead mold off of the stem. Try not to, because the mold might have punctured the stem all the way to the hollow core of the plant. Wiping away the dead mold will also wipe away the stem if it is dead. This will cause a stop in growth and possibly the loss of the plant as a whole. Leaving the stalk and the dead mold intact will keep the stem sealed – exposing the hollow inner core is a death sentence for the plant.

Marijuana is a very hearty and strong plant. It can live through some pretty major damage. While a mold and fungus infection may kill other plants, if the procedures outlined here are adhered to, the plant will live to maturity. It may have smaller buds than those plants without an infection, but it will still be greedily harvested once the buds have matured.

Mammals & Rodents

Animals love to nibble on marijuana. Whether it’s just the smell or taste or if they know that they can get high is unknown. The culprit most of the time is deer, as the first sign of having a foraging visitor nipping your buds will show on the top of the plant.

The only way to stop this foraging is to push a light mesh cover over your plants or to hang geranium bags on your plants. Animals hate the scent of geraniums, so they stay away from your plants. Another scent-based solution is mothballs. Most animals will shy away from mothballs, as the scent isn’t comparable to anything they eat in the wild.

In growing in the wild, there are bound to be a few deaths in the crop. Whether this is due to male culling or animals or mold or fungus, plant a few extra plants to make up for the future losses and the crop will turn out fine.

How do you combat pests? Tell us your grow tips below.

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CBD maker, HIA sue Drug Enforcement Administration over extract rule

The Hemp Industries Association and a South Carolina CBD manufacturer are suing the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration over a recent rule they say wrongly criminalizes how hemp extracts are made.

CBD maker, HIA sue Drug Enforcement Administration over extract rule is a post from: Marijuana Business Daily: Financial, Legal & Cannabusiness news for cannabis entrepreneurs

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Edibles Recipe: CBD and THC-Infused Energy Bites

These energy bites, baked in a mini muffin tin, have all the crunch and chew your cannabis-loving heart desires. Full of nutrients, these treats are perfect for a quick breakfast, to snack on before a workout or to bring along for a stroll in the woods.

These fruit and nut cups are almost vegan, with the exception of the honey. Vegans can easily substitute brown rice syrup or agave instead — though brown rice syrup is less sweet than honey and agave is more sweet, so adjust accordingly.

I recommend making coconut oil infused with Bruce Banner, one of my current favorite strains, to use in this recipe. The high from Bruce Banner is long-lasting and encourages productivity.

These energy bites can also be made with a CBD-infused coconut oil if you’re not looking to get high. As with all edibles, it’s best only to consume if you are aware of the dose that is right for you — as well as the THC:CBD ratio you prefer.

INGREDIENTS – Serves 24

  • 2 1/4 cups almonds
  • 2/3 cup coconut flakes
  • 1/2 cup dried cherries
  • 1/2 cup crisped rice cereal
  • 2 tablespoons hemp seeds
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1/3 – 1/2 cup honey (adjust for desired sweetness)
  • 3 – 4 tablespoons infused coconut oil
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

DIRECTIONS

  1. Heat oven to 325° F. Line a 24-cup mini-muffin tray with un-infused canola or coconut oil and set aside.
  2. Place the almonds and coconut on a baking tray with sides. Bake until the coconut has colored, about 7-10 minutes. Because oven temperatures vary, check after 5 minutes. Allow time to cool.
  3. Place the toasted almonds and coconut, along with the dried cherries, in the bowl of a food processor. Pulse two or three times to cut up some of the larger ingredients.
  4. In a large bowl, combine the mixture of almonds, coconut and cherries with the crisped rice cereal, hemp seeds and turmeric. Toss well to distribute evenly.
  5. In a microwave-safe bowl, combine the honey and cannabis-infused oil. Heat for one minute on medium, then stir and cook an additional minute. Stir in the vanilla extract. Immediately pour the infused honey over the dry mixture and toss to distribute well.
  6. Working quickly, spoon about two heaping tablespoons of the mixture into each cup of the mini muffin tray. With fingers lightly oiled (with regular, un-infused oil), press the mixture down.
  7. Bake for 15 minutes.
  8. Allow the bites to cool thoroughly before removing from the pan. If they stick a bit, just run a knife around the edge. They should come out easily if thoroughly cooled.

TELL US, how do you mix cannabis with an on-the-go lifestyle?

Originally published in the print edition of Cannabis Now. LEARN MORE

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Potential Preventive Medicinal Benefits of Regular CBD Use

Editor’s Note: This article is meant to represent a research review only, and should not be used or regarded as medical advice.

Remember being told as a child, “an apple a day will keep the doctor away”? Well, eating apples is not enough to ensure health. But what about, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”? That phrase from Benjamin Franklin may not have been about health but it sure is good advice.

The main facets of preventive medicine are rather intuitive. These include leading a healthy lifestyle, which means eating a healthy diet, getting exercise, not smoking, and limiting alcohol use.[1]

And while many people today try to live by these rules (as much as possible), cannabidiol (CBD) may provide an additional boost to help prevent certain conditions. CBD possesses a multitude of beneficial properties and, as such, is used to treat many different conditions. However, what is less known about CBD is its propensity as a proactive agent that protects against disease.

Here’s what we know so far:

Arthritis. Substantial evidence has indicated a role for CBD in the treatment of inflammatory conditions like arthritis. And a pre-clinical study demonstrated that topical CBD application was effective in reducing joint inflammation in an animal model induced via chemical injection.[2] However, the study also showed that prophylactic use of CBD prevented the development of joint pain. While this was performed in animals, not humans, the data suggest CBD could prevent the development of osteoarthritis.

Pain/drug-dependency. Cannabis is a very effective analgesic for chronic pain, and several studies have shown that it can be used in place of opioids, which are potentially addictive. In fact, states where medical cannabis is legalized have lower rates of opioid overdoses.[3] And a recent study showed that CBD could reduce drug cravings in drug- abstinent individuals with heroin use disorder; CBD also decreased anxiety associated with drug withdrawal.[4] These data suggest that, in addition to preventing use/abuse of opioids for pain, CBD may also prevent relapse in drug-dependent individuals.

Cancer. Studies have indicated that certain cannabinoids may play a role in the prevention or treatment of different types of cancers. CBD was found to exert chemopreventive effects in an animal model of colon cancer.[5] At high doses, CBD prevented polyps from forming. Additionally, using cells taken from human colon tumors, researchers found that CBD also prevented tumor cells from growing. Please note that there is no direct evidence showing that CBD or cannabinoids alone can prevent or cure cancer in humans.

Obesity. Cannabis is widely known for its appetite-stimulating effects. However, it also plays an unexpected role in obesity by regulating genes associated with brown fat. This type of fat is activated in lower temperatures and works to keep the body warm, potentially burning up fat stores. A study found that, in addition to stimulating the creation of brown fat, CBD appear appears to inhibit lipogenesis.[6] Thus, long-term use could affect weight and potentially prevent obesity.

Cardiovascular disease. Research has found that just one dose of CBD can decrease blood pressure in healthy adults.[7] And several other studies have indicated that CBD may increase vasodilation, reduce myocardial infarct size and inflammation associated with diabetes, and protect brain cells after stroke.[8] Taken together, these data suggest that CBD could help prevent the development of certain cardiovascular conditions, of course if combined with other components of a heart healthy lifestyle.

Greater research is needed to better understand the potential of CBD as a part of preventive health, as well as optimal dosing strategies. As always, be sure to talk to your doctor or medical cannabis dispensary before starting or changing treatment or if you have any questions.

Image Credit: Kapa65

Image Source: https://pixabay.com/users/kapa65-61253/

References

  1. Willett WC, et al. Prevention of Chronic Disease by Means of Diet and Lifestyle Changes. In: Jamison DT, et al., editors. Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries. 2nd edition. Washington (DC): The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development / The World Bank; 2006. Chapter 44. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK11795/ Co-published by Oxford University Press, New York.
  2. Philpott HT, et al. Attenuation of early phase inflammation by cannabidiol prevents pain and nerve damage in rat osteoarthritis. Pain. 2017;158(12):2442-2451.
  3. Bachhuber MA, et al. Medical cannabis laws and opioid analgesic overdose mortality in the United States, 1999-2010 [published correction appears in JAMA Intern Med. 2014;174(11):1875.] JAMA Intern Med. 2014;174(10):1668-1673.
  4. Hurd YL, et al. Cannabidiol for the reduction of cue-induced craving and anxiety in drug-abstinent individuals with heroin use disorder: A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial [published correction appears in Am J Psychiatry. 2020;177(7):641]. Am J Psychiatry. 2019;176(11):911-922.
  5. Aviello G, et al. Chemopreventive effect of the non-psychotropic phytocannabinoid cannabidiol on experimental colon cancer. J Mol Med (Berl). 2012;90(8):925-934.
  6. Parray HA & Yun JW. Cannabidiol promotes browning in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Mol Cell Biochem. 2016;416(1-2):131-139.
  7. Jadoon KA, et al. A single dose of cannabidiol reduces blood pressure in healthy volunteers in a randomized crossover study. JCI Insight. 2017;2(12):e93760.
  8. Stanley CP, Hind WH, O’Sullivan SE. Is the cardiovascular system a therapeutic target for cannabidiol? Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2013;75(2):313-322.

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